Money20/20 Europe 2018 | Recap | PayTechLaw

Money20/20 Europe 2018: The biggest circus in the world performs in Amsterdam – A Recap

Beitrag auf Deutsch lesen

 

Superlative

Money20/20 Europe 2018: This year, Money20/20 Europe took place in Amsterdam for the first time. The move from Copenhagen has paid off: The RAI is an outstanding event location and will be the home for the Money 20/20 Europe in the next years.

Welcome to the Money20/20 Europe – The greatest FinTech show on Earth

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

The exhibition was huge, and well laid out. Of course, one could not miss to pass by the big companies (well, except for the big German banks who once again did not show up). There was no lack of superlatives. The visitors of the Money 20/20 Europe were warmly welcomed by the banner at the entrance: „Welcome to the Money 20/20 Europe – The greatest FinTech show on Earth“. The scenes were pompous, almost like a circus and the usual suspects appeared as circus-tamers. Industry leaders like Chris Skinner, Dave Birch, Pascal Beuvier, Ghela Boskovich and 11: FS took the handle in their hands.

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

This year’s chief of the circus ring, however, was an old warhorse from Silicon Valley, nobody less than “The Woz”, Steve Wozniak. When The Woz entered the circus ring (aka The Big Top Stage), the ranks were filled to the last seat. The keynote („Technology, Money and the Future of Everything“) promised a lot, the expectations were accordingly high. The „next big thing“, however, was not announced this time. The Woz parried questions confidently, but remained rather superficial in his answers. The Apple fans in the audience did not care, The Woz was entertaining and that was sufficient for us.

Networking: Money20/20 Europe 2018

Networking is traditionally emphasized at Money 20/20 and it was the same this year. If you wanted to meet old friends, make new contacts or scale your business, the Money20/20 again was a perfect platform. We asked Simon Taylor (Co-Founder of 11: FS) about his highlights of the Money 20/20 and he said that you literally “bump into EVERYONE, EVERYONE is being here, great for networking”.

 

There is nothing to add, unless you want to talk to representatives of major German banks, but that’s another story.

Networking Doesn’t Stop at Night

According to the theme „Networking doesn’t stop at night“, there were two industry nights this year: On Monday, the famous „Taste of Amsterdam“ festival opened its doors exclusively for the participants of Money20/20 Europe. The event was a big hit (even though the Secret Garden was rather strange. Who’s been inside, knows what I’m referring to…), there were dishes from all over the world. You’ve not been left thirsty either 😉 .

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

On day 2, the participants of Money20/20 Europe took over the Reguliersdwarsstraat in the centre of Amsterdam and turned the night into day.

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

In addition to the official events, there were numerous side events. At this point, we would like to thank PPRO, PayU, solarisBank and PaymentandBanking for the invitations to their side events. What a fun!

Participants and Topics

There were no big surprises among the participants, with a significant increase in companies form the sectors of blockchain, fraud prevention, and identity. This year, however, there was thematically no „eureka moment“. Spectacular product announcements or innovations? Dead loss. Instead, the hype themes of the previous years were soberly ticked off and that‘s a good thing. The main topics in our point of view:

PSD2 – Open Banking

Frank: PSD2 remained to be one of the major topics. The focus was on open banking and data sovereignty. Carlos Torres Vila (CEO of BBVA) emphasised in his keynote address that all customer data collected by banks belongs exclusively to customers and that data protection and data sovereignty is a fundamental right. Every customer must be able to have one‘s data at one’s proposal.

Privacy is a basic human right, so the price for any services should not be your privay. (Carlos Torres Vila, CEO of BBVA)

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

André Bajorat, CEO of figo, already expressed this refreshing insight some time ago in a PAYMENTANDBANKING podcast. However, it is gratifying that banks are now also coming to this understanding. Sebastian Siemiatkowski (CEO of Klarna) also made it clear in his keynote address that banks should no longer be „obsessed“ by themselves, but should focus on the needs of their customers. PSD2 paves the way for this. Dave Birch is also of the same opinion and moderated an interesting panel with the topic: „The Data is yours, isn’t it?“. However, anyone who decides not to pay with their data must also be prepared to pay a fee for the services used, says Carlos Torres Vila. I am convinced that many customers have this willingness.

Susanne: Agreed. The topic access to accounts still sparks a lot of discussion but it seemed to me that there was a lot of talk but less truly innovative products that leverage PSD2. Generally, I had the feeling that we are now entering a phase of consolidation. The changes introduced by PSD2 have now become a reality. Now is the time for implementation. One often discussed obstacle to this is that not all member states have transposed PSD2 as of yet. Even, for instance, the host country, The Netherlands, have not transposed PSD2. That slows things down.

GDPR – There are still many building sites

Frank: There was a lot of talk about GDPR: Before coming into force it was – justifiably – criticized that the regulation was partly impractical. Now, after coming into force, one wonders how to deal with the practical hurdles. In her workshop „PSD2 and GDPR: Interactions and contradictions“, Monica Monaco tried to dissolve some contradictions between the PSD2 and the GDPR. Finding? There is still a lot to be done.

Susanne: One tangible impact of GDPR was that the list of participants was not available. It’s a bit absurd when it is impossible to get informed about who is going to attend a conference to schedule meetings when the purpose of such conference is networking.

Blockchain

Frank: As regards the topics Fraud Prevention and Blockchain, I refer to Suanne’s comments below as well as the ones by Miriam Wohlfarth, Kilian Thalhammer, and Rafael Otero in their recap on PAYMENTANDBANKING. For me, the impression has solidified that Blockchain Technology continues to be a fertile soil for great visions. However, many products and product ideas have not (yet) found their way from the laboratory to the market. It remains exciting.

Susanne: True but I see first and interesting real life blockchain use cases for example the ones that I had the pleasure to talk about with the CEO of Billon in one of our latest podcast. Maybe they don’t yet get the attention they deserve because everybody seems to focus on ICOs.

Fraud Prevention

Regarding fraud prevention, there is a trend to behavioural identification, i.e. technology that is able to recognize if the person holding the smartphone is really the owner. The technology recognizes a person by the way someone holds the phones, moves, or swipes. Or, for desktop it recognizes a user after a few session by the way someone types. There’s the feel of total surveillance but it has the advantage that fraud prevention can be done completely in the background without the user having to be active. I found that in this area, there were some providers with really interesting and new products that show technological innovation.

Identity

Frank: There were many companies that introduced marketable identity products, e.g. for purposes like risk management, fraud prevention and improving UX when registering new customers. There were interesting developments in the field of „authentication“, using biometrics. Dave Birch moderated an interesting panel to this topic and explained the difference between „identification“ (who I am) and „authentication“ (it’s me) in his inimitably charming-British way. I have missed a solution that solves the topic AML / KYC user-friendly and at the same time legally compliant and transnational. I realize that this wish is naive, as long as the EU does not succeed in finally creating a uniform legal framework and thus enabling a level-playing field. Maybe, however, this is just a lame excuse because there is so much possible from a technological perspective. A startup from Germany (Authada) is preparing itself to solve the issue.

Susanne: Identity was an area that I focussed on at the conference, and I spoke with many providers that where there. I found there to be many, quite similar products. I was on the lookout for a product that truly simplifies KYC checks. There were many that offered this in various ways that have become simple and user-friendly. From German perspective, however, I have to say that these solutions will not solve the issues because they do not comply with the current, limited options that German AML allows to employ. That’s very sad, because as Frank said, this is an obstacle to a level-playing field if in the other member states allow new, user friendly technologies. The German Ministry of Finance could allow new methods by legislative decree. Thus it is important to do some political advocacy in this area.

Voice

Another frequently discussed topic was Voice. The breakthrough is done, said Kelly Wenzel (Amazon Pay) and stated in her keynote:

Voice is the new medium and might be the next frontier.

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

Whether this is true, I don’t know. Let’s wait and see. I can’t really say anything meaningful to this and leave it to the experts like Rafael Otero to assess whether Voice is going to be the next big thing.

Susanne: What I missed were the banks. Only few had their own booth at the exhibition or send somebody to the conference. I can understand that they may not want to participate in the exhibition but I find it strange that only a few sent delegates to observe what is going on in the payment world. Despite of cooperations, it seems that conventional banks and fintech is drifting further apart. I also found it a pity that only very few regulators participated. Again, I find it difficult that they don’t get to see the new trends and the technological progress. And where is a better place than at Money 20/20 to see so many products in such a condensed time and form.

What else?

Susanne: I attended a meeting of the European Women Payments Network (EWPN). They had a very interesting panel that discussed inter alia topics like unconscious bias and education in the fintech industry. When I went up to the meeting place and saw all the participants, I thought to myself “wow that’s a lot of women”. It was quite striking to see so many women in one place. However, when I apply the “flip test”, I have to say that I wouldn’t have found the same amount of men in any way striking. That shows that fintech still is quite the domain of men, although this may change quickly. Tram Anh Nguyen, co-founder of the CFTE Centre for Finance Technology and Entrepreneurship, said at the EWPN meeting that with knowledge and skills it is now the time to advance your career the fintech industry. I believe that’s true. The industry is still open and accessible. Who is able and knowledgeable has good chances to advance.

Frank: I am looking forward to the next Money 20/20 Europe, maybe with one or the other German bank, some regulators and more use cases for blockchain as well.

Susanne: That calls for a soft drink – cheers to that!

 

Beitrag auf Deutsch lesen

 

Money20/20 Europe 2018 – Größter FinTech-Zirkus der Welt zu Gast in Amsterdam

Superlative

Die Money20/20 Europe 2018 fand erstmalig in Amsterdam statt. Der Umzug von Kopenhagen hat sich rentiert. Das Rai war eine herausragende Event-Location und soll es auch in den kommenden Jahren bleiben. Die Expo war großflächig, übersichtlich und wie immer so angelegt, dass man an den Big Companies nicht vorbei kam (wo waren eigentlich die deutschen Banken?). An Superlativen mangelte es nicht.

Welcome to the Money20/20 Europe – The greatest FinTech show on Earth

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

Die Besucher der Money20/20 Europe 2018 wurden bereits am Eingang zur Expo mit dem Banner „Welcome to the Money20/20 Europe – The greatest FinTech show on Earth” begrüßt. Die Kulisse war pompös, wie die eines Zirkus. Als Zirkus-Dompteure traten die üblichen Verdächtigen in Erscheinung. Branchengrößen wie Chris Skinner, Dave Birch, Pascal Beuvier, Ghela Boskovich und 11:FS gaben sich die Klinke in die Hand.

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

Chef der Manege war in diesem Jahr jedoch ein alter Haudegen aus dem Silicon Valley, kein Geringerer als „The Woz“ Steve Wozniak. Als The Woz die Manege betrat (The Big Top Stage), waren die Ränge bis auf den letzten Platz gefüllt. Die Keynote („Technology, Money and the Future of Everything“) versprach Großes, die Erwartungen waren dementsprechend. The „next big thing“ wurde jedoch nicht verkündet. The Woz parierte Fragen souverän, blieb jedoch eher oberflächlich in seinen Antworten. Den Apple-Jüngern im Publikum war es egal, The Woz war unterhaltsam und das reichte uns.

Networking: die Money20/20 Europe 2018

Networking wird bei der Money20/20 traditionell groß geschrieben. Das war auch in diesem Jahr so. Wer vor hatte bestehende Kontakte zu pflegen, neue Kontakte zu knüpfen und sein Business zu skalieren, für den bot die Money20/20 auch in diesem Jahr eine ideale Plattform. Auf die Frage, was denn das Highlight der Money20/20 waren, sagte uns Simon Taylor (Co-Founder von 11:FS), dass man auf der Money20/20 buchstäblich in JEDEN trifft, den man gerne spreche möchte.

Dem ist nichts hinzuzufügen, außer man möchte mit Vertretern deutscher Großbanken sprechen. Insofern verweise ich auf die Ausführungen von Jochen.

Networking Doesn’t Stop at Night

Unter dem Motto „Networking Doesn’t Stop at Night“ gab es in diesem Jahr gleich zwei Industry Nights. Am Montag öffnete das berühmte „Taste of Amsterdam“ Festival seine Tore und zwar exklusiv für die Teilnehmer der Money20/20 Europe 2018. Die Veranstaltung war der Kracher (auch wenn der Secret Garden eher strange war. Wer drin war, weiß was ich meine…), es gab Gerichte aus aller Herren Länder. Verdurstet ist man auch nicht ;-).

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

Am Tag 2 übernahmen die Teilnehmer der Money20/20 Europe die Reguliersdwarsstraat im Zentrum von Amsterdam und machten die Nacht zum Tag.

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

Neben den offiziellen Veranstaltungen wurden außerdem zahlreiche Side-Events ausgetragen. An dieser Stelle möchten wir unsherzlich bei PPRO, PayU, solarisBank und PaymentandBanking für die Einladungen zu Euren Side-Events bedanken. Was ein Spaß!

Teilnehmer und Themen

Bei dem Teilnehmerkreis gab es keine großen Überraschungen, wobei eine deutliche Zunahme von Unternehmen aus den Bereichen Blockchain, Fraud Prevention und Identity zu verzeichnen war. Thematisch gab es dieses Jahr jedoch kein „Heureka“. Spektakuläre Produktankündigungen oder Innovationen? Fehlanzeige. Stattdessen wurden die Hype-Themen der Vorjahre nüchtern abgefrühstückt, das war auch gut so. Die großen Themen aus unserer Sicht:

PSD2 – Open Banking

Frank: PSD2 war weiterhin ein großes Thema. Im Mittelpunkt standen die Themen Open Banking und Datensouveränität. Carlos Torres Vila (CEO der BBVA) betonte in seiner Keynote, dass alle Daten, die Banken von Ihren Kunden erheben, ausschließlich den Kunden gehörten und dass Datenschutz und Datensouveränität fundamentales Grundrecht sei. Jeder Kunde müsse die Möglichkeit haben, über seine Daten frei zu verfügen.

Privacy is a basic human right, so the price for any services should not be your privay. (Carlos Torres Vila, CEO of BBVA)

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

André Bajorat, CEO von figo, hat diese erfrischende Erkenntnis zwar bereits vor einiger Zeit in dem PAYMENTANDBANKING Podcast ausgesprochen. Es ist jedoch erfreulich, dass nun auch einige Banken – wenn auch nicht die deutschen – zu dieser Einsicht gelangen. Auch Sebastian Siemiatkowski (CEO von Klarna) machte in seiner Keynote deutlich, dass Banken nicht länger von sich selbst „besessen“ sein, sondern lieber die Bedürfnisse ihrer Kunden in den Mittelpunkt stellen sollten. Die PSD2 würde hierfür den Weg ebnen. Dave Birch sah das auch so und moderierte hierzu ein interessantes Panel mit dem Thema „The Data is yours, isn’t it?“. Wer sich jedoch dafür entscheidet, nicht mit seinen Daten zu bezahlen, der müsse auch bereit sein, ein Entgelt für die in Anspruch genommenen Dienstleistungen zu entrichten, findet Carlos Torres Vila – zu Recht. Ich bin mir sicher, dass viele Kunden diese Bereitschaft mitbringen.

Susanne: Stimmt. Das Thema Access to Accounts wurde zwar immer noch viel diskutiert, aber leider eher viel geredet, als dass ich wirklich neue Produkte dafür gesehen hätte, die sich die PSD2 dafür zunutze machen. Insgesamt hatte ich das Gefühl, dass eine Phase der Konsolidierung eingetreten ist. Die Neuerungen durch PSD2 sind jetzt Wirklichkeit, nun geht es um die Umsetzung. Ein oft diskutiertes Hindernis ist dabei, das noch nicht alle Mitgliedsstaaten die PSD2 umgesetzt haben. Auch zum Beispiel das Gastgeberland, die Niederlande, nicht. Das bremst.

GDPR / DSGVO – Es gibt noch viele Baustellen

Frank: Viel wurde über GDPR / DSGVO gesprochen. Vor dem Inkrafttreten wurde – zu Recht – kritisiert, dass Teile der Verordnung nicht praxistauglich seien. Nach dem Inkrafttreten fragt man sich nun, wie man mit den praktischen Hürden umgehen soll. In ihrem Workshop „PSD2 and GDPR: Interactions and contradictions“ hat Monica Monaco versucht, einige Widersprüche zwischen der PSD2 und der GDPR aufzulösen. Erkenntnis? Es gibt noch viele Baustellen.

Susanne: Konkrete Auswirkung von GDPR war, dass man die Teilnehmerliste nicht mehr einfach bekam. Das führt so eine Konferenz, bei der es um Networking geht, auch etwas ad absurdum, wenn man sich nicht vorher informieren kann, wer da ist, um sich zu verabreden.

Blockchain

Frank: Für die Themen Fraud Prevention und Blockchain verweise ich auf die Ausführungen von Susanne unten sowie die von Miriam, Kilian und Rafael in dem Recap von PAYMENTANDBANKING. Für mich hat sich der Eindruck verfestigt, dass die Blockchain Technology zwar weiterhin Nährboden für große Visionen ist. Viele Produkte bzw. Produktideen haben jedoch (noch) nicht den Weg vom Labor in den Markt gefunden haben. Es bleibt spannend.

Susanne: Das stimmt, es gibt aber schon erste, interessante Blockchainanwendungen, zum Beispiel die, über die ich in unserem letzten Podcast mit dem CEO von Billon sprechen konnte. Die bekommen aber vielleicht noch zu wenig Aufmerksamkeit, weil alle immer nur auf ICOs fokussiert sind.

Fraud Prevention

Bei Fraud Prevention geht der Trend immer mehr zu verhaltensabhängiger Identifizierung, also Methoden, mit denen erkannt werden kann, ob jemand, der das Smartphone hält, auch wirklich der Eigentümer ist. Der wird dann erkannt an der Art wie er sich bewegt, wie er über das iPhone wischt oder es hält. Oder am Desktop kann ein Nutzer nach ein paar Sessions an der Art, wie er tippt, wiedererkannt werden. Das hat schon etwas von einer totalen Überwachung, aber hat den Vorteil, dass alles im Hintergrund ablaufen kann, ohne dass der Nutzer das merkt. In diesem Bereich fand ich, gab es ein paar sehr interessante Anbieter mit wirklich technischen Neuerungen.

Identity

Frank: Es waren viele Unternehmen vertreten, die für das Thema Identity marktreife Produkte präsentierten, z. B. für das Risk Management, die Fraud Prevention, die Verbesserung der UX bei der Registrierung neuer Kunden. Interessante Entwicklungen gab es im Bereich der „Authentication“ mittels Biometrie. Dave Birch moderierte hierzu ein interessantes Panel und erklärte den Unterschied zwischen „identification“ (wer ich bin) und „authentification“ (ich bin es) in seiner unnachahmlich charmant-britischen Art. Vermisst habe ich eine Lösung, die das Thema AML/KYC nutzerfreundlich und gleichzeitig rechtskonform sowie länderübergreifend löst. Vielleicht ist dieser Wunsch etwas naiv, jedenfalls solange es der EU nicht gelingt, endlich einen einheitlichen Rechtsrahmen zu schaffen und damit ein level-playing field zu ermöglichen. Vielleicht aber wird dieser Punkt auch nur als lahme Ausrede vorgeschoben, denn technologisch geht heute fast alles. Ein Startup aus Deutschland (Authada) schickt sich an, das Problem zu lösen.

Susanne: Mit dem Thema Identität habe ich mich auf der Konferenz intensiver beschäftigt und mit vielen Anbietern gesprochen. Ich fand, es gab sehr viele, sehr ähnlich Produkte. Ich habe vor allem nach etwas gesucht, das KYC Checks vereinfacht. Der Klassiker ist dabei Scannen des Ausweises und dann ein Selfie. Da gab es sehr viele, die das in unterschiedlicher Form angeboten haben. Das ist inzwischen sehr einfach und nutzerfreundlich geworden. Aus deutscher Perspektive muss ich leider sagen, dass es alles nicht hilft, weil nach deutschem Geldwäscherecht bislang ein solches Verfahren nicht den Anforderungen an eine ordnungsgemäße Identitätsüberprüfung entsprechen würde. Das ist sehr schade, weil es, wie Frank schon gesagt hat, ein Ungleichgewicht schafft, wenn im Rest der EU diese Verfahren ausreichen. Dabei könnte so etwas durch Rechtsverordnung zugelassen werden. Da sollte noch politische Überzeugungsarbeit geleistet werden.

Was mir gefehlt hat, sind gute technische Lösungen für das Thema Authentifizierung gerade im Kontext mit der starken Kundenauthentifizierung, die ab 2019 Pflicht wird. Klar, gab es da einige Anbieter aber nicht wirklich etwas, das so reibungslos ist, dass es nicht doch Auswirkungen auf die Abbruchrate haben würde. Da erhoffe ich mir immer noch etwas Besseres. Denn an der Regulierung wird sich nichts ändern, da müssen technische Lösungen her.

Voice

Frank: Auch das Thema Voice wurde auf der Messe häufig diskutiert. Der Durchbruch sei geschafft, meinte Kelly Wenzel (Amazon Pay) und stellte in ihrer Keynote fest

Voice is the new medium and might be the next frontier.

Money20/20 Europe 2018 | PayTechLaw

Ob der Durchbruch wirklich geschafft sei, bleibt wohl abzuwarten. Da können andere mehr dazu sagen, als ich – so zum Beispiel Rafael Otero.

Susanne: Wer für mich gefehlt hat, sind vor allem die Banken. Die wenigsten waren mit Ständen vertreten, noch hatten sie jemanden geschickt. Dass sie nicht präsentieren, kann ich noch verstehen, aber dass nur wenige jemanden schicken, der sich zumindest anschaut, was in der Payment-Welt passiert, ist doch merkwürdig. Da driften konventionelle Banken und FinTechs trotz einiger Kooperationen weiter auseinander. Auch schade fand ich, dass fast keine Aufsichsbehörde teilnimmt. Auch da finde ich es schwierig, dass diese die neuen Trends und den technischen Fortschritt gar nicht mitbekommen. Dabei kann man kaum woanders als auf der Money20/20 in so kurzer Zeit einen Einblick in verschiedene Produkte bekommen.

Was war noch?

Susanne: Ich habe an einem Treffen des European Women Payments Network (EWPN) teilgenommen. Das war sehr interessant mit einem Panel u.a. zu den Themen unconscious bias und Fortbildung im Bereich FinTech. Als ich zum Treffpunkt ging und alle Teilnehmerinnen dort stehen sah, dachte ich erst, das sind ja sehr viele Frauen. Es war ganz auffällig, so viele Frauen an einem Ort zu sehen. Wenn ich aber mal den „flip it“ Test anwende, wäre mir dieselbe Anzahl Männer, die sich an einem Ort treffen, gar nicht aufgefallen. FinTech ist leider doch noch stark eine Männerdomäne. Allerdings kann sich das leicht ändern. Tram Anh Nguyen, Co-Founder des CFTE Centre for Finance Technology and Entrepreneurship, meinte, dass jetzt die Zeit ist, in der FinTech-Branche mit Wissen Karriere zu machen. Ich denke da ist etwas dran. Die Branche ist noch durchlässig und wer etwas kann und weiß, der kann leicht weiterkommen.

Frank: Ich freue mich auf die nächste Money20/20 Europe, vielleicht dann auch mit der einen oder anderen deutschen Bank, Aufsichtsbehörde und mehr use cases im Bereich Blockchain.

Susanne: Darauf ein Softgetränk!

 

Titelbild / Cover picture: Copyright © PayTechLaw

 

0 Kommentare

Dein Kommentar

An Diskussion beteiligen?
Hinterlasse uns Deinen Kommentar!

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.